No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man at the Renwick Gallery

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

Last weekend I stopped by the Renwick’s No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man. Since the exhibit opened earlier in the month, it wasn’t that crowded which was nice. Overall, I thought the exhibition was beautiful, filled with magnificent and large installations. Pictured above is Marco Cochrane’s Truth is Beauty, a beautiful, large sculpture.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

Duane Flatmo’s Tin Pan Dragon was pretty fascinating. The artist used odds and ends to fashion together a dragon. From the picture above, you can make out a muffin tin used to construct part of the dragon’s face.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

I was a little in awe when I saw David Best’s Temple. The intricate patterns of the wood that lined the walls and ceiling, were beautiful.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

Here you can get a sense of the layout of the room.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

Along the walls were bits of rectangular shaped pieces of wood that visitors wrote on and left wedged into the installation. I especially liked the message, “Soak in every single moment,” that a visitor had left behind.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

One room contained large constructions of different shapes with intricate patterns cut out of them, with light shining through. Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu’s work was definitely one of my favorites of the show.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

I liked how the lights cast shadows that extended the patterns of the different objects.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

A couple of them used regular light, while the largest shape had a light that changed color every few seconds.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

Above is an image of the object with the changing light.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

Another one of my favorites were the FoldHaus Art Collective’s Shrumen Lumen, which consisted of large mushroom-shaped sculptures with lights that changed colors after every few minutes.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

Above is a close-up of the mushroom sculptures.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

I thought Christopher Schardt’s Nova was a fun interactive piece. Visitors would lie on the ground, looking upward of the shifting, changing screen affixed to the ceiling.

The Art of Burning Man at Renwick Gallery

My favorite interactive piece was a chalkboard room by Candy Chang, Before I Die. Visitors wrote on the walls different thoughts about what they wanted to do before they died.

No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man was a beautiful exhibit. Yet again, I enjoyed the installations that sprawled across the galleries of the Renwick.

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